Dennis Begos
Dr. Dennis Begos

Dr. Dennis Begos has Advice for Men Concerning their Health

Although not as popular as some awareness months, during the month of June, Men’s Health is a hot topic and Dr. Dennis Begos has several points to address regarding this focused spotlight and subject matter.

“There are always going to be jokes about how men never ask for directions and avoid the doctor like the plague, but in all seriousness, men need to be aware of their health for their longevity and quality of life.” Dr. Dennis Begos explained. “We hear about the top health risks and conditions that affect men, such as heart disease and prostate cancer, but one very critical disease that often gets brushed aside is colorectal cancer.”

Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. The reason why this is has to do with several factors. The first is obvious, if you’re not going to get a colonoscopy (screening for cancer), you’re not going to get an early diagnosis; and the earlier this disease is diagnosed, the better the chances are for survival. The second obstacle is that colon polyps go unnoticed most of the time. Colon polyps are not always cancerous if caught early, but as they proliferate, they can rapidly become cancerous and can be challenging to treat. The third reason that men are not diagnosed early enough is that they ignore their symptoms. Symptoms are not always prevalent, but the following are the most common: constipation, bloating, abdominal pain, excessive gas, diarrhea, bloody stools, narrow stools, weight loss, vomiting, nausea, and fatigue.

Risk factors associated with colon cancer in men are being over the age of 45, having a family history of polyps or colon cancer, smoking, being overweight, having Crohn’s disease, or ulcerative colitis. Dr. Dennis Begos stated, “Screenings save lives. It’s a much better scenario to be proactive, make an appointment with your physician, request a colonoscopy, live a healthy lifestyle and eat a nutritious diet with lean protein, plenty of fiber and fresh produce to keep the colon healthy. Many men are apprehensive about getting a colonoscopy, but the actual test is painless and quick. The preparation is often cited as being worse than the procedure, and colon cancer can be prevented or treated with minimally invasive techniques if caught early.”

Dennis Begos MD is a highly-regarded surgeon with many years of progressive surgical techniques and performing life-saving surgery. Dr. Begos has been in hospital leadership and mentoring and training roles for his peers for many years. He takes great pride in educating physicians, medical professionals, and patients.

Dr. Dennis Begos Saves Local Football Coach

Dr. Dennis Begos

Surgeon, Dennis Begos hadn’t expected to save a football coaches life the day he arrived early for his son’s football game. While waiting in his car, listening to the Patriots-Ravens game on the radio, Dr. Begos decided to head over and watch the remaining two minutes of the other football game in progress. Minutes later, Dr. Dennis Begos saw Coach Kevin Lynch fall face down on the field. He was the first to get to coach Lynch along with two other parents and an on-duty EMT (Emergency Medical Technician).

Dr. Begos recollects that the events leading up to it were out of sorts. He wasn’t sure why he turned off the Patriots game in his car and headed to the bench area, or why he sat just 20 feet away from where the coach had fallen down, but in hindsight, he realizes it all happened for a reason, to save a man’s life.

“I was there just a few minutes when I saw Kevin collapse,” Begos said. “Even though I’m a doctor, I’m the last guy on the field if a kid gets hurt. If the coaches ask me to come look at what’s going on, I will, but for some reason, I just ran over there. I don’t know what it was that made me do that.”

Dr. Begos quickly began CPR. “Kevin lost his pulse and basically stopped breathing. I’m thinking, ‘Man, this is the real thing.’ I’ve done CPR many times in the hospital, but unfortunately, with CPR, many people don’t survive.” Said Dr. Begos.

After a few minutes of CPR, Coach Lynch started to move his legs and had shallow breaths, but it didn’t last long. A few minutes later, Lynch had lost his pulse, and Begos began to administer CPR once again. When paramedics arrived, they used the defibrillator to shock Lynch’s heart back to life and placed a breathing tube in his throat. Lynch at this time was alert enough to not want the breathing tube and tried to remove it. Dr. Begos knew this was a good sign because Coach Lynch was aware of his situation and very alert.

Coach Lynch suffered the same kind of heart attack that Bob Harper (fitness and health guru) suffered. It’s known as the widowmaker. A widowmaker heart attack is caused by a 100 percent blockage of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery. When these blockages happen, the heart can suddenly stop with not much warning or time for bystanders to react. Coach Lynch received excellent care and a stent to open up the LAD artery, and Dr. Dennis Begos was given a season game ball at the end of the season for his quick action and heroic deed.

Dennis Begos - Pay it Forward by Giving Back

Dennis Begos, Surgeon, Consultant and Volunteer: Why it’s Essential to Pay it Forward by Giving Back

Dennis Begos 6Surgeon, Dr. Dennis Begos has over 20 years of clinical experience in both academic and community hospitals and has held numerous key leadership positions, including Medical Staff President and Chair of Surgery. With his extensive experience in teaching and medical writing, Dr. Begos has been highly esteemed by his peers and patients over the past few decades, as he is recognized for his surgical expertise, innovation, and his significant experience with quality and patient safety analysis and reporting.

Along with his many accolades, Dr. Dennis Begos volunteers at Lazarus House, a local homeless shelter. He believes in giving back to the community. Dr. Begos states, “Many people travel to foreign countries for “mission trips,” which is commendable, but we have many people right in our backyard who also are needy and can use assistance.”

Dennis Begos fully supports the mission of Lazarus House. Since 1983, Lazarus House has been in operation as an emergency homeless shelter, providing services within a safe environment to struggling individuals and families and helping them to break the cycle of poverty.

 

They have housing availability, and when families and individuals find it challenging to pay for utilities and rent, Lazarus House provides food and clothing programs to assist families in those difficult times. They also offer ESOL (English as a Second Language) training, work preparation courses, and other classes to prime individuals with the skills and the self-reliance they need to succeed. Dr. Begos volunteers his time for the betterment of the community as a whole by empowering individuals with the tools they need to become independent and to flourish.

 

At the hospitals where Dr. Begos has practiced, he was known as the “go-to” guy for general surgery by the medical staff and his peers. These colleagues also entrusted their family members to Dr. Begos and would refer many cases to him, which he states a very high honor.

From 2016 to 2017 Dennis Begos, MD was heavily involved in hospital leadership, being the president of the medical staff at Winchester Hospital. Dr. Begos did his general surgery residency at Yale University (1990-96), where he was honorably named Chief Resident in his last year. Dr. Begos then went on to do a one-year fellowship in colon and rectal surgery at the Cleveland Clinic (1996-97), where he trained with some of the world’s foremost experts in the field.

Along with leadership positions within the hospital systems, Dennis Begos is very involved in the community, coaching his two son’s baseball teams, as a church member, and volunteer.

Dennis Begos, MD: Innovation and Leadership Within the Healthcare System are Critical

Surgeon, Dr. Dennis Begos has over 20 years of clinical experience in both academic and community hospitals and has held numerous key leadership positions, including Medical Staff President and Chair of Surgery. With his extensive experience in teaching and medical writing, Dr. Begos has been highly esteemed by his peers and patients over the past few decades, as he is recognized for his surgical expertise, innovation, and his significant experience with quality and patient safety analysis and reporting.

 

Dr. Begos was born and raised just north of New York City in Yonkers, NY, but spent two years living in Ireland after college, where his mother is from and where he still has relatives today. He started Medical school in Ireland but was able to transfer back to finish medical school here in the US, where he graduated 4th in his class. This is where Dr. Begos began to understand the importance of leadership and dedication in regard to advanced medical concepts and practices.

With determination in tow, Dr. Begos began a prestigious general surgery residency at Yale University (1990-96), where he was named Chief Resident in his last year, which he considers a significant honor. At Yale, he spent a considerable amount of time doing research and published many papers and book chapters before going on to do a one-year fellowship in colon and rectal surgery at the Cleveland Clinic (1996-97), where he trained with some of the world’s foremost experts in the field.

Not long after Dr. Begos began his career in Massachusetts, he assumed numerous hospital leadership roles and was named the president of the medical staff at Winchester Hospital and chair of the department of surgery. Throughout the years, Dr. Begos was involved with medical quality and safety monitoring, implementing clinical protocols in surgery that improved patient satisfaction, decreased the length of stay, and lowered complication rates. This was a huge task that involved coordinating input from not only other surgeons, but also nursing, anesthesiology, hospital administration, physical therapy, and nutrition department heads, to name a few.

Dr. Dennis Begos has held both local and national administrative positions and has brought innovative surgical techniques to the healthcare system as well as teaching other surgeons these progressive, cutting-edge techniques to improve patient care and outcomes. Along with leadership positions within the hospital systems, Dennis Begos is very involved in the community, coaching his two son’s baseball teams, as a church member, and volunteer.

Dr. Dennis Begos was Instrumental in Training Surgeons in Laparoscopic Colectomy Procedures

Dennis Begos 

BOSTON, MA—Dr. Dennis Begoswas heavily involved in teaching other surgeons how to perform laparoscopic colon surgery when it was first making waves back in 1997. Dr. Begos began teaching his peers through courses at the Cleveland Clinic, Brown University, and other local hospital systems.

In the past, open surgery via a sizeable abdominal incision was the only way to access the colon and remove the diseased or infested area of the intestine. Dr. Dennis Begos was the first physician in the Boston area (likely all of Massachusetts) to perform laparoscopic colectomy, which is now a standard procedure.

Instead of a full abdominal incision, the minimally invasive procedure, Laparoscopic Colectomy, is performed directly through several tiny portal incisions in the abdomen and the navel. A small video camera is placed through one of the ports, and laparoscopic surgical tools are simultaneously used through the other tiny incisions. On a monitor, the surgeon can see the colon and surrounding areas to precisely retrieve the colon and pull it through one of the abdominal incisions. This allows the surgeon to operate on it outside of the body. The colon will easily be reinserted back into the body once the repairs have been made.

Dr. Dennis Begos training programs were detailed in several published papers, including Abstract, Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons1andSurgical Endoscopy, Epub2. From 2016 to 2017 Dennis Begos, MD was heavily involved in hospital leadership, being the president of the medical staff at Winchester Hospital. Dr. Begos did his general surgery residency at Yale University (1990-96), where he was honorably named Chief Resident in his last year. Dr. Begos then went on to do a one-year fellowship in colon and rectal surgery at the Cleveland Clinic (1996-97), where he trained with some of the world’s foremost experts in the field.

Along with his numerous leadership positions, in the past, Dr. Dennis Begos has been instrumental as an Assistant Professor of Surgery at Tufts University School of Medicine. Dr. Begos is also very involved in the community as an outreach coordinator and volunteer.

References:

1. Naar, D., Begos, DG, Alkoraishi, A. Comparison of Hand Assisted vs Total laparoscopic Colectomy: A single surgeon’s experience. Abstract, Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons, 5 (4):380 December, 2001.,

2. Schadde, E., Smith, D, Alkoraishi, A., Begos, DG. Hand-assisted colorectal surgery at a community hospital: A prospective analysis of 110 consecutive cases. Surgical Endoscopy 2006 Jul;20(7):1077-82. Epub 2006 May 26

Dr. Dennis Begos - Laparoscopic Colectomy

Dr. Dennis Begos, The First to Perform Laparoscopic Colectomy in Boston, MA

Dennis Begos 6
Dennis Begos 6

The large intestine also known as the colon can become diseased, blocked, cancerous and succumb to bleeding issues.  

 In the past, open surgery via a sizeable abdominal incision was the only way to access the colon and remove the diseased or infested area of the intestine.  

However, in 1997, Dr. Dennis Begos was the first physician in the Boston area (likely all of Massachusetts) to perform laparoscopic colectomy, which is now a standard procedure

What is a Laparoscopic colectomy? Instead of a full abdominal incision, the minimally invasive procedure, Laparoscopic colectomy, is performed directly through several tiny portal incisions in the abdomen and the navel.

 A small video camera is placed through one of the ports, and laparoscopic surgical tools are simultaneously used through the other tiny incisions.

On a monitor, the surgeon can see the colon and surrounding areas to precisely retrieve the colon and pull it through one of the abdominal incisions.  This allows the surgeon to operate on it outside of the body.

The colon will easily be reinserted back into the body once the repairs have been made.

Dennis Begos, MD is always on the frontline of new procedures, cutting-edge devices, and advanced technology.  

Being one of the first surgeons to offer this advanced laparoscopic colectomy procedure to his patients and to train other physicians and medical staff on how to perform this method was second nature to him, as he takes great pride in continuously learning new techniques and perfecting his expertise.

Without new ideas and pioneering minds like Dennis Begos’, patients would be stuck with mediocre and inferior treatment methods.

Dennis Begos 3
Dennis Begos 3

At the hospitals where Dr. Begos has practiced, he was known as the “go-to” guy for general surgery by the medical staff and his peers.  These colleagues also entrusted their family members to Dr. Begos and would refer many cases to him, which he states a very high honor.

From 2016 to 2017 Dennis Begos, MD was heavily involved in hospital leadership, being the president of the medical staff at Winchester Hospital.

Dr. Begos did his general surgery residency at Yale University (1990-96), where he was honorably named Chief Resident in his last year.

Dr. Begos then went on to do a one-year fellowship in colon and rectal surgery at the Cleveland Clinic (1996-97), where he trained with some of the world’s foremost experts in the field.

Along with leadership positions within the hospital systems, Dennis Begos is very involved in the community, coaching his two son’s baseball teams, as a church member, and volunteer.

Dennis Begos, MD Wants to Remind People about the Dangers of Wire Bristle Grill Brushes

Dennis Begos 

As warmer weather approaches, many individuals will escape the inside and dine alfresco by grilling their vegetables, chicken, burgers and even pizza. BBQ themed parties and picnics are well underway with Memorial day approaching, but do you know the dangers of using a wire bristle brush to clean your grill?

A few years ago, a patient that Dennis Begos, MD treated made the news. On the fourth of July, a man accidentally ingested wire bristles from a grill brush. After emergency surgery that removed 6 inches of his intestines, the man survived. However, this unfortunate situation could have led to much more severe circumstances with devastating outcomes, even death. Many people each year unknowingly eat these flexible wire bristles, and in some cases, the punctures can be inoperable. Along with life-threatening circumstances, these wire bristles cause extreme pain.

“It’s hard to say that he’s lucky, but he’s certainly lucky it wasn’t more serious than it was,” Dr. Dennis Begos, Former President of the Medical Staff at Winchester Hospital articulated.

The problem is that most people don’t realize that they’ve ingested the bristles until it’s too late because they are difficult to feel in the mouth. These can lacerate the esophagus, stomach, intestinal tract and rectum. It’s a much better choice to clean your grill with a ball of aluminum foil or a nylon bristle brush. Nylon bristles are much less damaging than wire and easier for the body to get rid of if they are accidentally eaten.

If the patient is experiencing severe blood loss that causes the blood pressure to drop significantly, additional medical treatments will be necessary. Patients will receive medications, IV fluids and possibly a blood transfusion if the blood count gets too low. This can prevent shock, heart issues, and other debilitating disorders from progressing. With precise endoscopic evaluation, detection of the bristles can be diagnosed, treated, and damaged areas can usually be removed and coagulated.

From 2016 to 2017 Dennis Begos, MD was heavily involved in hospital leadership, being the president of the medical staff at Winchester Hospital. Prior to that he was Chairman of the Department of Surgery for 10 years. Dr. Begos did his general surgery residency at Yale University (1990-96), where he was honorably named Chief Resident in his last year. Dr. Begos then went on to do a one-year fellowship in colon and rectal surgery at the Cleveland Clinic (1996-97), where he trained with some of the world’s foremost experts in the field. He is married with two boys, ages 25 and 22.

Surgeon, Dennis Begos: Was the First in Boston, MA to Perform Laparoscopic Colon Surgery

Dennis Begos 

Dennis Begos, MD, wants patients to know that colon polyps go unnoticed most of the time, affecting upwards of 200,000 people a year. Polyps are cell growths on the lining of the colon or large intestine. There are diagnostic tests such as colonoscopy, barium enema and CT scanning that can detect these polyps, and non-invasive stool testing for blood or abnormal DNA that are also effective. Polyps may grow over time and turn cancerous, which is why if you have polyps, it’s best to have them removed.

“Polyps don’t turn cancerous in every case, but your risk of developing cancer increases with the number and size of colon polyps you have. When they do turn cancerous, polyp cells divide and grow very quickly within the colon and rectum” states Dr. Dennis Begos.

Colon cancer is the third most common type of cancer in the United States. It affects nearly 50,000 Americans each year. If caught early on, it can easily be treated. Typically, there are little to no signs or symptoms of the polyps, so it’s critical to have regular colonoscopies beginning at age 50, or younger if you have a family history of colon or rectal cancer. For unknown reasons, younger people are more commonly being diagnosed with colon cancer.

Dr. Dennis Begos was instrumental in bringing the cutting-edge laparoscopic colon cancer procedure into the Boston area. During his training at Yale and a fellowship at the Cleveland Clinic, he worked with some of the pioneers in laparoscopic colon surgery. When he began practice north of Boston, he was the first to perform it in the Boston area, possibly all of Massachusetts. Now it’s the gold standard for most patients undergoing colon cancer surgery.

Screenings Save Lives
It’s imperative to talk to your physician about protecting yourself and your loved ones who may be at risk for colorectal cancer. Getting a colonoscopy screening is critical for adults with risk factors or over the age of 40. If a family member was diagnosed with colorectal cancer younger than age 50, you may need to start earlier. A colonoscopy is a well tolerated, safe procedure and one that can save your life. When polyps are discovered, they can be removed during a colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy. If they are cancerous, surgery is required in most cases. Chemotherapy or radiation is usually unnecessary if caught early on. It’s always best to be proactive in your colon health, rather than waiting and finding that the cancerous polyps have grown and spread into other organs.

Dr. Begos did his general surgery residency at Yale University (1990-96), where he was honorably named Chief Resident in his last year. Dr. Begos then went on to do a one-year fellowship in colon and rectal surgery at the Cleveland Clinic (1996-97), where he trained with some of the world’s foremost experts in the field. He is married with 2 boys, ages 25 and 22.